Tink






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Publication: The Horn Book Magazine
Author: Heppermann, Christine M
Date published: May 1, 2011

Tink [Children of Crow Cove] by Bodil Bredsdorff; trans, from the Danish by Elisabeth Kallick Dyssegaard Middle School Parrar 123pp. 5/11 978-0-374-31268-8 $16.99 g

"He had brought bad luck on them all. He didn't belong and had no right to stay." And so, like Eidi before him, Tink leaves the crowded yet loving collective at Crow Cove; however, he returns immediately after finding a drunkard, passed out by the road, who needs Tink's adopted family's help. Having accidentally let the sheep destroy the summer vegetable garden, Tink believes it's his fault that the family is barely making it through the winter on a dwindling supply of potatoes. Then Burd, the man he rescued, teaches him to fish, and the extra bounty the two bring in sustains them all. Even readers familiar with the previous two books (The Crow-Girl, rev. 5/04; Eidi, rev. 11/09) in this exquisitely crafted Danish series may have trouble keeping the various family members and visitors straight. Still, the primary relationship between Tink and Burd is tender and genuine; and once again Bredsdorff fully immerses readers in her achingly beautiful evocation of the rugged coastal setting. The theme of the importance of home and connectedness permeates the series, as when Burd eloquently outlines life's essentials for Tink: "Order in your things, someone to care for, and a place to belong. Otherwise you become like a boat that drifts along without an anchor." CHRISTINE M. HEPPERMANN

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