Landmark Coming Along






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Publication: Syracuse New Times
Date published: May 25, 2011

With the warmer weather and more daylight hours comes increased construction activity at the Landmark Theatre renovation project. When we last checked in March 24, we saw a large pile of foam waiting to be installed as sub-flooring for the dressing rooms. On our latest visit, May 13, that floor-and the floor for the enlarged stage-had since been covered with bent steel before concrete gets poured on it. According to Aaron Walter, project manager, it took four days to get the bent steel floor laid.

A 90-ton crane has been gumming up Clinton Street traffic while it's being used to set beams and girders for the 80-foot-high stage ceiling. When it's time to to place the support beam for that ceiling, workers at Clark Rigging, 945 Spencer St., will spend a day assembling the 200-ton crane needed to that task.

Enough progress has been made inside the 362 S. Salina St. theater that May 13 and 14 saw two high school proms in the cleaned-out lobby, Christian Brothers Academy and Manlius Pebble Hill. Prepping usable bathrooms was a priority for Walter's crew.

Progress edition: The Landmark renovation project is starting to take shape, as evidenced by these photos taken on May 13 (clockwise from left): Some incredible finds had been hidden in storage in the theater's catacombs, including plaster casts that were used to replicate the plaster work around a new doorway in the lobby; while the bathrooms became a priority as prom season loomed, workers finalized the impressive tile work (the too-modern mirrors will be replaced); beams, girders and a reinforced steel floor (shown before concrete covers it) will support the expanded stage and its 80-foot ceiling; and a crew preps the former Clark's Ale House spot for dramatic windows that will overlook West Jefferson Street.

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