Invasive Candida infections in children: the clinical characteristics and species distribution and antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp.

SUMMARY: Belet N, Çiftçi E, Aysev D, Güriz H, Uysal Z, Taçyildiz N, Atasay B, Dogu F, Kendirli T, Kuloglu Z, Ince E, Dogru U. Invasive Candida infections in children: the clinical characteristics and species distribution and antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. Turk J Pediatr 2011; 53: 489-498. The aims of the study were to examine the distribution of Candida spp. isolated from sterile body sites, the antifungal susceptibility of the isolates to amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin, and factors affecting mortality with invasive Candida infections in children. Thirty-five children with invasive candidiasis between January 2004 and January 2008 were evaluated retrospectively. The antifungal susceptibility of isolated Candida species was studied by Etest. Of the invasive Candida infections, 65.7% were due to C. albicans. The second most common isolated species was C. parapsilosis (11.4%). The rates of resistance to fluconazole, amphotericin B and voriconazole were 8.5%, 2.8% and 5.7%, respectively. Caspofungin was the most effective antifungal agent. 22.8% of the patients died in the first 30 days. In univariate analyses, increased mortality was associated with stay in the intensive care unit, the presence of central venous catheter (CVC), failure to remove CVC, and mechanical ventilation. Key words: invasive candidiasis, children, risk factors, antifungal susceptibility.

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