The secret is out! CPHVA award winners announced: now let's prepare for conference 2012






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Publication: Community Practitioner
Author: Fergie, Gavin
Date published: April 1, 2012

I have a secret - I sit writing this editorial with the knowledge that I know who the winners will be at the inaugural CPHVA Awards. By the time you read this, the secret will have been shared, and the finalists sitting at their tables will have either applauded gracefully while someone eise's name is called out as the winner of this yearly prize, or be beaming whenever they look at their winner's trophy sitting on the mantelpiece.

CPHVA members are not immune to the world of secrets, and many took the time to nominate colleagues they admired for consideration in the CPHVA Awards. No blowing of trumpets, no large production; just a secret email to say why their colleague should be considered the practitioner of the year in their specific professional category.

It was obvious that these nominations were submitted in secret, as many of those selected as finalists were blissfully unaware until the call came through inviting them to the awards evening in London. Several were flabbergasted that somebody had taken the time to nominate them, oblivious to the fact that someone considered them worthy of such an honour. It's such a British trait - the reluctance to self-promote, amplified by our membership's natural hesitancy to advertise their practice or themselves to their colleagues, their employer or to further afield.

This quiet dignity has seen many practitioners through difficult times. The essential element of their professional demeanour, the ability to be seen as an individual worthy of trust and confidence is one that many professions and professionals prize highly. Secrecy has many types.

The CPHVA has another event that, at times, appears to be a secret club: the conference delegate club. It's a secret because it seems many are unaware where it is, when it is and what it is. This year, more than any other, is one to share the conference secret. This year is a once-ina-lifetime opportunity to be there. This year we are celebrating 150 years of public health nursing.

So let us share the conference secret with as many of our colleagues as possible - that you will leave empowered, reflecting on your practice, with new friendships made and old friendships refreshed. We have many professional secrets that our conference speakers and supporters want to hear. Will you contribute?

After all conference isn't really a secret, despite all that has been said. It's in Brighton on 7 and 8 November 2012. No covert signs or codes, no dark glasses; just you and hundreds of like-minded professionals at the best CPHVA conference for 150 years. I can guarantee it will win that award.

Author affiliation:

Gavin Fergie

Professional Officer

Unite/CPHVA

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