Hanging Tough






Latest articles from "Diverse Issues in Higher Education":

Here comes Brazil (November 8, 2012)

Native safety (November 8, 2012)

NAVIGATING THE ACADEMY (November 8, 2012)

A STUNNING ADMISSION (November 8, 2012)

Quote of Note (November 8, 2012)

Barbara Mink Succeeds John Roueche as CCLP Director (November 8, 2012)

FAMILY MATTERS (November 8, 2012)

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PROMOTING AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN AND SEXUAL ASSERTIVENESS IN REDUCING HIV/AIDS: AN ANALYTICAL REVIEW OF THE RESEARCH LITERATURE
Journal of Cultural Diversity (December 1, 2011)

Last Rites
The Antioch Review (July 1, 2011)

LE CONFORT ET L'INDIFFÉRENCE: L'enseignement féministe à l'ère de l'individualisme
Canadian Social Work Review (July 1, 2010)

Four Points of Eerie Silence
Canadian Mennonite (February 20, 2012)

Servant Leaders Who Picked Up the Broken Glass
The Journal of Pan African Studies (Online) (April 1, 2012)

Introduction
Anthropological Quarterly (April 1, 2012)

Collaboration within the Context of the Healthy School Approach (HSA): The Case of a Disadvantaged Elementary School in Quebec
Canadian Journal of Education (October 1, 2011)

Publication: Diverse Issues in Higher Education
Date published: August 2, 2012

Black men, particularly those in low-income urban areas, are proving to be resilient in the face of such challenges as discrimination and poverty, a new study finds. Black men are relying on five methods of resilience, researchers at the University of Missouri and Drexel University said: committing to learn from mistakes, refocusing to address difficulties, creating supportive environments, obtaining support from religion and persevering. The researchers define resilience as demonstrating positive mental health despite adversity. Dr. Lisa Bowleg, an associate professor in the School of Public Health at Drexel University and one of the study's authors, said in a news release that while the mens resilience is "admirable," communities and governments must do more to help them. "The men's efforts only can be translated into success if they are supported by social environments and policies that change the odds against them," she noted. The study was published in the journal Qualitative Health Research and funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Child Health and Development.

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