Latest articles from "Diverse Issues in Higher Education":

Cashing In?(July 30, 2015)

Far-reaching religious study(July 30, 2015)

Prolific collegiate feminism(July 30, 2015)

on the move(July 30, 2015)

Trends in Graduate Degrees Conferred to Students of Color(July 30, 2015)

Long-Serving Former Xavier President Says HBCUs Face 'Tough Decade'(July 30, 2015)

Louisiana legislation(July 30, 2015)

Other interesting articles:

Schools for the Better Making of Men? Undergraduate Black Males, Fraternity Membership, and Manhood
Culture, Society and Masculinities (April 1, 2015)

Men of Color and Masculinities: Researching the Postsecondary Education and Identity Development Nexus
Culture, Society and Masculinities (April 1, 2015)

PROMOTING AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN AND SEXUAL ASSERTIVENESS IN REDUCING HIV/AIDS: AN ANALYTICAL REVIEW OF THE RESEARCH LITERATURE
Journal of Cultural Diversity (December 1, 2011)

Last Rites
The Antioch Review (July 1, 2011)

LE CONFORT ET L'INDIFFÉRENCE: L'enseignement féministe à l'ère de l'individualisme
Canadian Social Work Review (July 1, 2010)

HIV Activist
Diverse Issues in Higher Education (January 2, 2014)

PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO ADDRESSING MEN'S HEALTH DISPARITIES: GUEST EDITORIAL
International Journal of Men's Health (October 1, 2013)

Publication: Diverse Issues in Higher Education
Date published:
Language: English
PMID: 14090
ISSN: 15575411
Journal code: BIHE

Black men, particularly those in low-income urban areas, are proving to be resilient in the face of such challenges as discrimination and poverty, a new study finds. Black men are relying on five methods of resilience, researchers at the University of Missouri and Drexel University said: committing to learn from mistakes, refocusing to address difficulties, creating supportive environments, obtaining support from religion and persevering. The researchers define resilience as demonstrating positive mental health despite adversity. Dr. Lisa Bowleg, an associate professor in the School of Public Health at Drexel University and one of the study's authors, said in a news release that while the mens resilience is "admirable," communities and governments must do more to help them. "The men's efforts only can be translated into success if they are supported by social environments and policies that change the odds against them," she noted. The study was published in the journal Qualitative Health Research and funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Child Health and Development.



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